Emerging Geospatial Technologies in Environmental Research, Education, and Outreach

  • Sergio Bernardes Center for Geospatial Research, Department of Geography, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, GA 30602, United States of America
  • Margueritte Madden Center for Geospatial Research, Department of Geography, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, GA 30602, United States of America
  • Ashurst Walker Center for Geospatial Research, Department of Geography, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, GA 30602, United States of America
  • Andrew Knight Center for Geospatial Research, Department of Geography, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, GA 30602, United States of America
  • Nicholas Neel Center for Geospatial Research, Department of Geography, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, GA 30602, United States of America
  • Akshay Mendki Center for Geospatial Research, Department of Geography, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, GA 30602, United States of America
  • Dhaval Bhanderi Center for Geospatial Research, Department of Geography, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, GA 30602, United States of America
  • Andrew Guest Center for Geospatial Research, Department of Geography, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, GA 30602, United States of America
  • Shannon Healy Center for Geospatial Research, Department of Geography, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, GA 30602, United States of America
  • Thomas Jordan Center for Geospatial Research, Department of Geography, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, GA 30602, United States of America

Abstract

Drawing on the historical importance of visual interpretation for image understanding and knowledge discovery, emerging technologies in geovisualization are incorporated into research, education and outreach at the Center for Geospatial Research (CGR) in the Department of Geography at the University of Georgia (UGA), USA. This study aimed to develop the 3D Immersion and Geovisualization (3DIG) system consisting of uncrewed aerial systems (UAS) for data acquisition, augmented and virtual reality headsets and mobile devices, an augmented reality digital sandbox, and a video wall. We were working together integrated data products from the UAS imagery, including digital image mosaics and 3D models, and readily available gaming engine software to create augmented and virtual reality immersive visualizations. The use of 3DIG in research is demonstrated in a case study documenting the seasonal growth of vegetables in small gardens with a time series of 3D crop models generated from UAS imagery and Structure from Motion photogrammetry. Demonstrations of 3DIG in geography and geology courses, as well as public events, also indicate the benefits of emerging geospatial technologies for creating active learning environments and fostering participatory community engagement.


Keywords: Environmental Education; Geovisualization; Augmented Reality; Virtual Reality; UAS, Photogrammetry


Copyright (c) 2020 Geosfera Indonesia Journal and Department of Geography Education, University of Jember


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Published
2020-12-30
How to Cite
BERNARDES, Sergio et al. Emerging Geospatial Technologies in Environmental Research, Education, and Outreach. Geosfera Indonesia, [S.l.], v. 5, n. 3, p. 352-363, dec. 2020. ISSN 2614-8528. Available at: <https://jurnal.unej.ac.id/index.php/GEOSI/article/view/20719>. Date accessed: 14 may 2021. doi: https://doi.org/10.19184/geosi.v5i3.20719.
Section
Original Research Articles